A peaceful day

Phillipians 4:4-8

For with Thee is the fountain of life; in Thy light shall we see light. Psalm 36:9
15.6.13

Our AO6 Science books

Posted by Jeanne

So we’ve been talking about science the Charlotte Mason way, and about how I’ve been trying to do it this year.  This is supposed to be the post where I explain how we’ve gone about that. Yeah.  You'll notice it's been a while coming, and that's because I have really struggled with getting it onto the page.  I know what we've done and why we've done it and how it's been received, but boy it's hard to put it into writing!

After spending another three hours grappling with the post today, in addition to many hours during the past two weeks,  I've come to the conclusion that I'm trying to include much too much in one post.  As a consequence, I'm just going to list here the books we've used and press publish. We'll see where we go from there.

First, here is the official AO list for this year 6:

  • Albert Einstein and the Theory of Relativity by Robert Cwiklik - Physics
  • Secrets of the Universe: Discovering the Universal Laws of Science by Paul Fleisher - Physics
  • Archimedes and the Door of Science by Jeanne Bendick - Science History / Physics
  • The Sea Around Us by Rachel Carson - Oceanography
  • Galileo and the Magic Numbers by Sidney Rosen - Physics
  • School of the Woods by William J. Long - Natural history
  • It Couldn't Just Happen by Lawrence Richards - Young Earth Creationism Apologetics
  • A Little Brother to the Bear by William J. Long - Natural history (Free read)
We moved the two William Long Books to free reads, where we may or may not get to them, and replaced them with these three books:
  • Australian Backyard Naturalist by Peter Macinnis
  • Australian Backyard Explorer by Peter Macinnis
  • Australian Backyard Astronomy by Dr Ragbir Bhathal and Jenny Bhathal
It Couldn’t Just Happen by Lawrence O. Richards is an excellent kids' apologetics book looking at the earth’s beginning from a young earth creation perspective.  We really liked this book, but we read it back in AO4 before the science schedule was changed, so we replaced it this year with Who Made the Moon? A Father Explores How Science and Faith Agree by Sigmund Brouwer, which approaches the earth's origins from a Christian old earth creation perspective.  It has been a difficult book to read, since it challenges many of our beliefs, but if we totally ignore all scientific advances or treat them as non-Christian and false,  then we are no better than the Church in Galileo's day, are we?  We risk making Christians appear foolish.  Know what you believe.

Physics is well covered in this year, so we added in a wonderful book on the history of chemistry called The Mystery of the Periodic Table by Benjamin D. Wiker. It looks at the chemistry that lead to the modern periodic table of the elements, and it is outstanding in the way it presents the big picture of science.  Wiker covers a remarkable amount of stuff – from the alchemists and the first known elements through to phlogiston and the discovery of oxygen,  and on to the structure of the atom.  This book along with the Einstein bio gives us the knowledge to read the Brouwer book.

Finally, in third term we'll be reading a biography of AO favourite, Jean-Henri Fabre entitled The Insect Man by Eleanor Doorly.

That means our final Peaceful Day AO6 Science List  looks like this:
  • Albert Einstein and the Theory of Relativity by Robert Cwiklik - Physics
  • Secrets of the Universe: Discovering the Universal Laws of Science by Paul Fleisher - Physics
  • Archimedes and the Door of Science by Jeanne Bendick - Science History / Physics
  • The Sea Around Us by Rachel Carson - Oceanography
  • Galileo and the Magic Numbers by Sidney Rosen - Physics 
  • School of the Woods by William J. Long - Natural history (Free Read)
  • A Little Brother to the Bear by William J. Long - Natural history (Free read)
  • Australian Backyard Naturalist by Peter Macinnis - Australian natural history
  • Australian Backyard Explorer by Peter Macinnis - Australian physical geography
  • Australian Backyard Astronomy by Dr Ragbir Bhathal and Jenny Bhathal - Australian astronomy 
  •  Who Made the Moon? A Father Explores How Science and Faith Agree by Sigmund Brouwer - Old Earth Creationism apologetics (Free read)
  • The Mystery of the Periodic Table by Benjamin D. Wiker - Chemistry (Free read)
  • The Insect Man by Eleanor Doorly - Natural history

We've done lots of other things for science too, this year - experiments using a great Lego education kit, replicating the experiments in the Fleisher book, watching videos to compliment our oceanography study.  All these need their own posts.  I also plan to review these books and explain more why we chose to use them.

At least now I have been able to tell you what we've read, and we can talk more about Living Science next time. Is there anything, in particular, that you'd like me to elucidate?

You can't believe how happy I am to get to the end of this post!!

14 comments:

Deborah said...

Great start with the list of books. Yes, I would like to see the books in a show and tell. :o) I don't mind them being one at a time either.

* * *

I've just spent a few minutes over at amazon looking at some of those titles. Quite interesting, even if I'm not really a science girl.

Erin said...

I want to hear it all! Helpful in narrowing down aren't I?;)

Ruby said...

Great list Jeanne! You shouldn't sweat the long posts, keep it simple. I am a little envious of your love of Science, knowledge and enthusiasm for it. It was never my strong suit at school and not a big enough priority in my teaching :-( (I did however excel at cards when at boarding school!)

Mama Squirrel said...

We really enjoyed The Insect Man. I think you can still find it free online too.

Garner Mom said...

I've jotted down some of your titles, and would love to know how you plan to schedule. A chapter a week over a term? Also do you require oral or written narration for your science titles?

Brandy Vencel said...

I'm saving this for our Y6! I want to add some of the things you added, even if it is only for free reading. I think they'd be great!

Ingi Mc said...

I would be interested in a bit more of an explanation about what "Living Science" is and how it differs from regular science. As non-CM homeschooler, it's a bit of a mystery to me!

I do look forward to seeing what practical activities you've done and a bit more detail about the books - how you reconcile those science ideas that don't coincide with your faith. I promise I won't write diatribes in the comments!

Richele said...

Oh, I'm glad you've finally put your toes in the water : )
Question 1: What was this Lego experiment kit?
Question 2: You couldn't wait to add Chemistry, could you ; )

A CM-science education that inspires both parent and child to wonder is waaay to much for a single post, let-alone 10 posts. Please, take your sweet time.

KayPelham said...

Thank you for this, Jeanne. "It has been a difficult book to read, since it challenges many of our beliefs, but if we totally ignore all scientific advances or treat them as non-Christian and false, then we are no better than the Church in Galileo's day, are we?"

Edit note: Paragraph 5 - you probably don't want that first We? I'm sure it happened while you were struggling to write and rewrite and hone the post down.

I appreciate you being a few years ahead of us. Just know I am watching you :)

Daisy said...

I'm glad you mentioned the OE creationist book. I've been looking for one for Lydia to read, as we like to cover multiple perspectives. I'm also going to be reading The Genesis Debate: Three Views on the Days of Creation over the summer. Don't know if that is one you'd be interested in at some point.

Erika Niemelä said...

Thank you for the "old-earth"-science book. We're starting year 5 in September, and I'm already worrying about how to explain "It couldn't just happen" in the year 6 schedule to my scientist husband. If I can add an "old-earth"-book to the "young-earth"-book it might be easier for him accept, or maybe I can substitute one for the other? Well, now at least I have some options... :)

amy in peru said...

I couldn't agree more, Richele... take this as a second of that motion, Jeanne. :)

amy in peru said...

We've read these books too (plus some, but minus insect man... thank you!), and after a year trial of Apologia science, I couldn't be happier coming back this last year again to living books. I just wish you were several years ahead of my eldest to help me figure out which books and how to scaffold them... I'm planning to intertwine Astronomy, Physics, and Biology (animal or plant?). We shall have to talk more about this. :)

Amy said...

Hmmm, I'd love to hear it all, too! And we'll try to read the old-earth book, because I want to see both sides! I'd also like to hear how you schedule things, since I'll be scheduling out a tweaked year 6 this summer.

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